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Sample Our List with These Discounted eBooks

We try to keep our readers posted whenever our books go on sale, because we know you all are voracious readers, and everyone likes to save a few dollars. This week offers such a bonanza of discounted eBooks that we’re pulling all of them together into a single post. Here is your shopping list:

Slip & Fall by Nick Santora
Faced with a struggling practice, a pregnant wife, and a sister in trouble, Robert Principe realizes the white-collar world isn’t as easy as he thought. He needs money. Fast.

“A gripping thriller….Santora’s characters will ensnare readers.” —Vince Flynn

Buy the eBook for $2.99: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

SEAL Team Six: Hunt the Wolf by Don Mann and Ralph Pezzullo

Navy SEAL Team Six commando Don Mann infuses his debut military thriller with the real-life details only a true insider can reveal. And when you’re done with Hunt the Wolf, dive straight into the sequel, Hunt the Scorpion, which is just on sale.

Buy the eBook for $2.99: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

The Revisionists by Thomas Mullen
Zed is an agent from the future. A time when the world’s problems have been solved. No hunger. No war. No despair…

The Revisionists is a fast-paced literary thriller that recalls dystopian classics such as 1984 and Fahrenheit 451, from the award-winning author of The Last Town on Earth.

Buy the eBook for $2.99: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

Triple Crossing by Sebastian Rotella
Valentine Pescatore, a volatile rookie Border Patrol agent, is trying to survive the trenches of The Line in San Diego. He gets in trouble and finds himself recruited as an informant by Isabel Puente, a beautiful U.S. agent investigating a powerful Mexican crime family.

Buy the eBook for $3.99: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

Guilt by Degrees by Marcia Clark

Harrowing, smart, and riotously entertaining, Guilt by Degrees is a thrilling ride through the world of LA courts with the unforgettable Rachel Knight. And who better to pilot that ride than Marcia Clark, the former prosecutor for the State of California, County of Los Angeles?

Buy the eBook for $5.99: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

The Assassin Trilogy by Derek Haas

A collection of three suspense novels by Derek Haas, the novelist and co-screenwriter of Wanted, 3:10 to Yuma and The Double. The Assassin Trilogy includes The Silver Bear, Columbus, and Dark Men, which all feature a hit man who quickly made a name for himself as one of the best in his profession.

Buy them all for $2.99! This is probably the best deal going: iBookstore | Kindle | Kobo | Nook | Sony

Find Your Next Thrilling Book Club Book

We want to make selecting your next book club book a little easier by sharing with you our Mulholland Book Club collection on Scribd. In this collection, you’ll find reading group guides for our paperbacks and exclusive Q&As with the author. Our hope is that this extra material removes some of the mystery (pun apologetically intended) around how to inspire your best book club conversation yet.

Currently in the collection are guides for Dan Simmon’s The Crook Factory, Joe R. Lansdale’s Edge of Dark Water, and Brian D’Amato’s Beauty. Bookmark us on Scribd to stay current on our book club books!

Fact and Fiction in Hunt the Scorpion

On sale today is Hunt the Scorpion, the second installment in Don Mann and Ralph Pezzullo’s SEAL Team Six series, which follows the trail of nuclear weapon components from a ship commandeered by Somali pirates through Libya and into a hornet’s nest of local police forces, terrorists, and the Iranian Revolutionary Corps.

The book’s depiction of post-Gaddafi Libya reads like it came out of this morning’s newspaper, which got me thinking: how much of Hunt the Scorpion is based in fact? Sure, it’s a rip-roaring, action-packed thriller, but Don Mann is a former Navy SEAL, and Ralph Pezzullo has written a previous novel with a CIA operative. Maybe there’s more fact to this fiction than I realized.

Fortunately, my curiosity did not go unslaked for long. Pezzullo kindly responded to my searching questions about Hunt the Scorpion‘s plot:

Yes, a good deal of the ops in the book actually happened. Most Americans probably aren’t aware that we’ve been fighting a clandestine war with Iran. Basically, they’re trying to develop nuclear weapons, and we’re determined to stop them. Iran runs this nasty little organization called the Quds Force, which is part of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution and reports directly to Supreme Leader—in other words, the religious leaders of  the country. The role of the Quds Force is exporting Iran’s Islamic revolution. It operates as highly-trained paramilitary unit and has been involved in bombings and assassinations in countries like Iraq, India, Bulgaria, Lebanon, and Thailand.

I keep my ear to the CIA-ops war ground, so to speak, and hear things. One of the most alarming things I’ve heard recently is about the efforts by al-Qaeda and the Quds Force to exploit the chaos in Libya following the overthrow of Gaddafi and get their hands on chemical weapons and nuclear material that had been developed while Gaddafi was in power.

Don and I discussed this and agreed that these events would make a great backdrop for Hunt the Scorpion. I can’t tell you exactly how much of it is true. I always do a lot of research. In this case it involved speaking to a number of people who have been to Libya recently and are familiar with what happened there after the fall of Gaddafi.

There you have it: enjoy Hunt the Scorpion for its nonstop thrills—and the SEALs are a lot of fun to be around!—and appreciate it as an unclassified primer in classified foreign policy.

Where to Find Your Next Favorite Books Online

Since Bookish launched earlier this month, I’ve been playing around with its recommendation engine—can an algorithm for books online really pit itself against a recommendation from a friend?

I’ve been pleased with the results! For the past three books Mulholland has published, Bookish’s recommendations are spot-on. Check them out and click on each image to visit the live recommendation on Bookish:

Gun Machine on Bookish

Hit Me on Bookish

Seal Team Six: Hunt the Scorpion on Bookish

Does this mean it’s time to seal off the front door, toss your phone, and put all your faith in the internet hive mind? Of course not—but there are worse ways to spend your time than by riffling through books online.

Detective John Rebus: Twenty-Five Years Later

Twenty-five years will take its toll on anyone. No one knows this better than former detective John Rebus, the star of Ian Rankin’s dazzling crime novels, who now finds himself a retired civilian, peering at cases from the outside.

But even the passage of years can’t bring closure to a cold case, and Rebus has found the ultimate lost cause: the disappearance of a woman from the side of the road with no witnesses, no body, and no suspect. Rankin explains the evocative nature of the road and Rebus’s emotional state as he digs up the past in the new novel, Standing in Another Man’s Grave:

While we see Rebus’s role evolving, so, too, does our understanding of Malcolm Fox:

Continue reading “Detective John Rebus: Twenty-Five Years Later”

Ernest Hemingway and Other Literary Spies

In Dan Simmons’s The Crook Factory, which is out in paperback on February 5th, Ernest Hemingway assembles an espionage ring from an unlikely team of misfits in order to root out Nazi infiltrators in Cuba. Though this storyline is, regrettably, a work of fiction, there are plenty of writers who really were spies. Some of our favorites include:

Christopher MarloweChristopher Marlowe

Oh yes, the man who brought us Faustus was also a spy. And his mysterious death at 29 raises all sorts of questions: was his fatal stab wound the result of a bar brawl? Or an assassination by the Elizabethan state? I highly recommend you listen to this BBC podcast for more on Marlowe.

Graham GreeneGraham Greene

The author of The Quiet American, The Third Man, and Our Man in Havana (among many other excellent novels) was recruited by his sister into the M16, resulting in a posting to Sierra Leone during the Second World War.

Anthony BurgessAnthony Burgess

Burgess did cipher work for British Army intelligence in Gibraltar during World War II before penning A Clockwork Orange in 1966. Perhaps there lies something encrypted in lines like “The trombones crunched redgold under my bed, and behind my gulliver the trumpets three-wise silver flamed”? Continue reading “Ernest Hemingway and Other Literary Spies”

How to Get Into Shape like a Navy SEAL


Inside SEAL Team Six
If your new year’s resolution was to get into shape, and the three-day juice cleanse didn’t get the job done, maybe you need to up the ante. We’ve been re-reading Don Mann and Ralph Pezzullo’s SEAL Team Six series in anticipation of the next installment, Hunt the Scorpion (pre-order it now: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-A-Million | Indiebound | Other Retailers). It got us thinking: how do those men stay in shape?

Fortunately, Don Mann—whom we like to think of as Mulholland’s Chuck Norris—wrote Inside SEAL Team Six: My Life and Missions with America‘s Elite Warriors. Amidst tales of dangerous missions and grueling trainings, we learn how Mann kept his mind and body prepared for the most extreme situations. So while you may never be called on to execute a covert op in Colombia or Afghanistan, here’s how to make sure you’re ready nonetheless.
Continue reading “How to Get Into Shape like a Navy SEAL”

Join SEAL Team Six on Another Adrenaline Packed Adventure

Hunt the Scorpion

Thomas Crocker and SEAL Team Six are back in the new thriller by former SEAL commando Don Mann. When a nuclear device goes missing and surfaces in the clutches of known terrorists, the United States calls on its most prized anti-terrorism force: Navy SEAL Team Six, the most elite combat unit on the planet.

Buy the Book: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-A-Million | Indiebound | Other Retailers
Buy the eBook: iBookstore | Kindle | Nook | Other Retailers Continue reading “Join SEAL Team Six on Another Adrenaline Packed Adventure”

A Review of The Revisionists: A good story, well told.

This week, Mulholland Books celebrates the publication of the paperback edition of Thomas Mullen’s THE REVISIONISTS, a Paste magazine Best Book of the Year, and the novel CNN.com calls “a compelling and complex page-turner” and “a paranoid thriller for the post-9/11 age.”

Read on for New York Times bestselling author Michael Koryta’s take on the book, and check back later in the week for a look at the bonus content for reading groups included in the new edition.

There are writers whose work you love to read, and writers whose work you love to read…but also make you mad with envy. The latter, I believe, comes at an intersection of talent and bravery. When the author’s narrative gifts and honed skills make you think damn, I wish I’d written that, and his or her choices makes you think damn, I wish I had the nerve to try something like this. Those writers stand out not just because of enormous literary abilities, but because it’s clear why they’re writing: for love of story.

I can create a list of writers who hit that intersection of talent and bravery regularly (Stewart O’Nan and Jess Walter rise swiftly to mind) but it’s a short one. Thomas Mullen is certainly on that list. Most of us talk about pushing our boundaries while we stay in a relatively tight space. We’ll venture from wall to wall, maybe, but we ain’t kicking them down and crossing the neighbor’s lawn. There’s a literary comfort zone at play, and in his fantastic third novel, THE REVISIONISTS, Thomas Mullen demonstrates that his literary comfort zone is not bound by genre…or place…or time. Tom demonstrates so damn many things, in fact, that were he not a genuinely good guy I’d start to hate him.

Coming off two brilliant historical novels – THE LAST TOWN ON EARTH is one of my favorite books of the past several years, and THE MANY DEATHS OF THE FIREFLY BROTHERS is every bit as good – Mullen decides to forsake the past for the future in THE REVISIONISTS. Or does he? While Zed is an agent from the future, sent to ensure that a Dystopian existence does not come off the rails if left in the hands of humans from the past, (well, present…are you starting to understand why this book would be so damn hard to write well? Trust me, the narrative flow is a lot smoother than this review), the weight of history hangs over the story at all times, so that just as the action and intrigue are pulling you forward, you’re pulling back to consider how we got here, and what it means.

Want to know if the story will engage you or if it’s just a bunch of pretty writing hung on a fascinating intellectual concept? I’ll let you tell me. Here are a few lines from the opening chapter:

“I saw a young woman carrying her toddler, a little black girl in a pink sweater, her hair braided with white beads. Residue from cotton candy encrusted the girl’s lips, and I thought to myself, She’s two, maybe three. I wanted to know her name, look her up in my databases, see if by any chance she would be one of the survivors…The girl smiled at me and waved. Her mother never noticed, never turned around, and after they reached an intersection I made myself stop. It doesn’t make any difference, I told myself. She’ll likely die, or, if she’s lucky, she won’t – yes, if she’s lucky, she’ll get to grow up in one of the most violent periods the world has ever known.

I waved back, helpless as she was.”

Got you yet? If not, please FedEx me the heart-shaped stone that resides in your chest. I would like it for my collection.

If you want plot, rest assured, you’ve come to the right place. Zed’s background, skill set, mission and progressive challenges are the stuff of great spy novels, with that added twist of sci-fi, and everything is anchored in a Washington D.C. setting that is closer to the realism of a George Pelecanos version of our capital than it is to the convenient montage used in so many fate-of-the-world thrillers. As is the case in any good novel, though, the book begins and ends with character, and Mullen’s creations are familiar and empathetic, coming time and again to questions of the deepest humanity: if we could cleanse prejudice by cleansing the linkages – ethnicity, faith, culture, family – that inspire divisions, what have we gained and at what cost?

Call it what you’d like – a literary-reader’s thriller, a thriller-reader’s literary novel – but I don’t have much interest in attempting to label this book, and one of the great pleasures of reading it was in the realization that Mullen has even less interest. It’s geared to no one and nothing but the story, and the beautiful writing, mind-bending plot, and moral complexity make it one of those truly rare finds: a good story, well told. A reason to read. Mullen’s books seem to have permanent residence on “Best of the Year” lists, and I expect you’ll see THE REVISIONISTS on several this December. Do yourself a favor and get to it first.

Michael Koryta (pronounced ko-ree-ta) is the author of many novels, some of which have won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Great Lake Books Award, and St. Martin’s Press/PWA Best First Novel prize, while also earning nominations for the Edgar, Quill, Shamus and Barry awards. In addition to winning the Los Angeles Times prize for best mystery, his novel Envy the Night was selected as a Reader’s Digest condensed book. His work has been translated into nearly twenty languages. A former private investigator and newspaper reporter, Koryta graduated from Indiana University with a degree in criminal justice. He currently lives in St. Petersburg, Florida, and Bloomington, Indiana. Connect with him on Facebook.

Dark Inspiration

Echo Railroad Bridge over Sabine River, north of I-10, Orange, Texas 1031091315BWI can’t think about Edgar Allan Poe without thinking about my life, because he was there in dark spirit, in my room and in my head. He was out there in the shadows of the East Texas pines, roaming along the creeks and the Sabine River, a friendly specter with gothic tales to tell. It was a perfect place for him. East Texas. It’s the part of Texas that is behind the pine curtain, down here in the damp dark. It’s Poe country, hands down.

These thoughts were in my mind as I toured the Harry Ransom Center’s current exhibition, From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. The Center, at the University of Texas at Austin, is celebrating the bicentennial of Poe’s birth with an exhibition that includes original manuscripts and illustrations. Looking at these artifacts, it occurred to me that Poe reached out from the grave and saved this East Texan from the aluminum chair factory. I know there are those who will say working in an aluminum chair factory is good honest work, and I’m going to agree. But I will say without hesitation and with no concern of insult that it damn sure wasn’t work of my choosing, and that it takes the skill of a trained raccoon and the I.Q. of a can of green beans, minus the label, to get it done.

Like Sisyphus forever rolling his rock uphill, I feared I would spend my time on Earth matching up aluminum runners, or linking chain to be pinned together by hissing and snapping and cutting and crimping machines, which in turn would be forklifted away in shiny piles of bent rods and flexible seats. Something to be sold and brought out on hot days at barbecues, and on hot nights to give mosquito-attacked, beer-drinking drive-in theater patrons a place for their butts to nestle.

Continue reading “Dark Inspiration”