SIGN UP FOR THE MULHOLLAND BOOKS NEWSLETTER for breaking news, exclusive material, and free books

Tag Archive for ‘New York Times’ rss

Year End Review: Don’t Tell Me

Dec 31, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors

With 2013 just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to sit back and reflect on another year of great content and great books. Check back twice daily in the last days of 2012 for a selection of our favorite MulhollandBooks.com posts from the past year! A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the […]

Year End Review: Five Tips for Horror Writers

Dec 31, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors, Writing

With 2013 just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to sit back and reflect on another year of great content and great books. Check back twice daily in the last days of 2012 for a selection of our favorite MulhollandBooks.com posts from the past year! USA Today has called BREED by Chase Novak “a thrill to […]

The Lineup: Weekly Links

Sep 07, 2012 in Weekly links

It’s been a great summer summer at Mulholland Books, and we topped it off with our August publication, SHAKE OFF by Mischa Hiller, which received glowing praise from the likes of Kirkus, PW and Booklist, as well as great reviews from blogs like the Murder By the Book Blog, BestsellersWorld.com, Tzer Island, and The Review […]

Genesis

Sep 05, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors

Scott Spencer wrote BREED under the pseudonym of Chase Novak. Keep reading to find out why. When, after writing ten novels, a writer decides to publish under a different name, there will inevitably be some curiosity about what is behind the sudden change. Thinking about my becoming Chase Novak, three things occur to me.   The […]

Summer Reading

Aug 20, 2012 in Guest Posts

I seem to be on a cycle in which I finish books in early summer for a late fall release. It happened again this year – much, I’m sure, to my editor’s frustration. I’ve just finished up my next novel The Black Box, blowing all kinds of deadlines in the process. The frustrating part for […]

What Happens Next?

May 25, 2012 in Guest Posts

A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the results of a 2011 psychological study to argue readers and viewers experience no negative effects from knowing the ending of a story in advance. We asked a few of our friends what they thought–check back regularly today for their responses. It’s like the lit crit version […]

Spoiler Alert

May 25, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors

A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the results of a 2011 psychological study to argue readers and viewers experience no negative effects from knowing the ending of a story in advance. We asked a few of our friends what they thought–check back regularly today for their responses. Mr. Fish doesn’t think he owes […]

Dickens, Professor?

May 25, 2012 in Mulholland Authors

A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the results of a 2011 psychological study to argue readers and viewers experience no negative effects from knowing the ending of a story in advance. We asked a few of our friends what they thought–check back regularly today for their responses. A common way to end the […]

Bad Dog

May 25, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors

A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the results of a 2011 psychological study to argue readers and viewers experience no negative effects from knowing the ending of a story in advance. We asked a few of our friends what they thought–check back regularly today for their responses. This is the silliest defense for […]

My Digital Confession

May 25, 2012 in Guest Posts, Mulholland Authors

A recent, controversial  New York Times article by Stanley Fish uses the results of a 2011 psychological study to argue readers and viewers experience no negative effects from knowing the ending of a story in advance. We asked a few of our friends what they thought–check back regularly today for their responses. Oz isn’t real […]