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The Lineup: Weekly Links, Hit Me Edition

Feb 25, 2013 in Weekly links

Contrasted ConfinementLawrence Block’s instant New York Times bestseller HIT ME has only been out for a handful of weeks, but the coverage has been extensive–perhaps in part because it very well may be Larry last novel ever.

Lawrence Block discusses the future of his career and his latest book in a profile for the New York Daily News. Don’t miss it.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel raves if HIT ME is Block’s “then it’s a fine finale for a writer who never stopped growing, and who allowed some of his series characters the same privilege of changing.”

Book Reporter says, “HIT ME does not disappoint. For his legion of fans, Block is working at the height of his powers … [a] true noir for our times. Do not miss this great read.”

“It’s a mark of Block’s storytelling skill that he can make lengthy philatelic interludes as fascinating as cloaks and daggers … It’d be a shame to hear no more from one of the most entertaining and unusual characters in the history of crime fiction, now that he’s back on the job,” says The Times-Picayune.

The Globe and Mail calls HIT ME “one of his best books ever…The plot is as tight as Jessica Simpson’s Spandex. Welcome back, Mr. Block.”

The Associated Press review, picked up widely in the Washington Post and much moresays, “In the hands of a lesser writer, the philately passages would be insufferable, but Block makes them interesting in their own right as well a window into the soul of a hit man who can dispatch innocent bystanders without remorse but won’t cheat on his wife and insists on being scrupulously honest.”

Marilyn Stasio raved in the New York Times Book Review‘s crime column, “Despite claiming he’s retired, Lawrence Block can’t seem to resist taking a few swigs from the poisoned cup … Aside from their ingenious methodology, what makes these amuse-bouches so delectable are the moral dilemmas Block throws up to deflect his philosophical anti­hero from a given task.” A review in The Columbus Dispatch concludes, “Block plays like a master on the consciences of his readers, raising moral dilemmas and then whisking them off behind a diverting bit of dialogue or drama.”

So what are you waiting for? Go pick up your copy now!

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